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As the target of defamation, you’re probably angry and feeling injured. You may find it difficult to get a job, grow your business, or even secure a loan. That’s way it’s critical to stop online defamation before it damages your reputation further.

We can help repair the damage to your reputation. Contact us now for help.

While it is possible to sue for online defamation, is that the best course of action? A slander lawsuit can amplify what you hope to hide and make a bad situation worse. Let’s take a look at what exactly online defamation is, what it does to your reputation, and what you can do about it.

 

Defamation has turned into somewhat of an epidemic online. This is largely due to the anonymous nature of the internet. Usually internet slander or libel occurs in comment sections, blog posts, review sites and social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter. The person who is guilty of the act can get away with it anonymously, facing little to no repercussions. It’s easy to do it, all that is needed is an internet connection, the right platform, and an audience of people who are willing to listen. However, it may not be as easy to remove defamation from the internet.

Slander vs Defamation

So what is defamation? It is a damaged reputation caused by false statements. Libel is written defamation while slander is expressed orally. An example of a libel case would be to remove defamatory posts online. Slander can come in an audio or visual format. An example of slander would be statements made through a video sharing website like Youtube.

 

Any bad review or public complaint about you or your business can be damaging. However, defamation is particularly harmful because it is objectively false and intended to destroy your reputation.

Online defamation can lead to a number of issues for both individuals and businesses, including:

  • loss of a job

  • inability to find work

  • lost clients or customers

  • inability to gain new clients or customers

  • decreased revenue or income

  • harassment by the press and/or on social media

  • embarrassment with friends and family members

  • closure of business

 

Are you thinking of filing an online defamation lawsuit? First, you’ll need to determine if you are dealing with defamation or just an unflattering opinion. To win a case, you must prove that public comments aren’t only false, but a statement of fact.

A review that says, “I was served a moldy muffin at The Flower Cafe” is a statement of fact, and if that statement is not true, it’s defamation. However, a review that states, “The server at The Flower Cafe was rude” is simply too vague and opinionated to qualify as defamation.

 

Defamation has turned into somewhat of an epidemic online. This is largely due to the anonymous nature of the internet. Usually internet slander or libel occurs in comment sections, blog posts, review sites and social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter. The person who is guilty of the act can get away with it anonymously, facing little to no repercussions. It’s easy to do it, all that is needed is an internet connection, the right platform, and an audience of people who are willing to listen. However, it may not be as easy to remove defamation from the internet.

 

So what is defamation? It is a damaged reputation caused by false statements. Libel is written defamation while slander is expressed orally. An example of a libel case would be to remove defamatory posts online. Slander can come in an audio or visual format. An example of slander would be statements made through a video sharing website like Youtube.

 

Additionally, the statement must be public. Since most damaging statements are made on review sites or social media, they would count as public. But a private conversation between the business owner and individual does not count. However, “public” does not have to be widespread. If someone makes a false, damaging statement to a third party, it could be defamation.

In addition to these requirements, there are different standards for public and private figures, as well as knowledge that the statement is false. For specific details, it’s best to contact a qualified attorney.

 

Contact the Website Administrator and Hosting Company

While the search engine giant isn’t making it any easier to taken down libel or slander, people can still take action to defend themselves against online reputation attacks. There is the option of reporting the defamation directly to the website host that is holding the defamatory remarks. This can be done by finding the company that hosts the website and then contacting the webmaster through an admin email. It is also a good idea to look up the site’s terms and conditions to see if the guilty party is in violation of their rules.

Contact the Person Who Posted the Defamatory Content Online

There is also the option of contacting the person who made the defamatory remarks. A polite plea may be what it takes to remove the content offline. While this may be a long shot, since you are dealing with someone who may enjoy publishing harmful material, it is still worth a try.

Get a Court Order to Have the Defamation Removed

When all else fails, there is always the option of obtaining a court order to take down the defamation. To obtain a court order, the attorney must provide legitimate claims for the lawsuit and then pursue the party who published the material. When faced with a court order, the vast majority of websites will comply and remove online defamation.

Hide or Bury Defamatory Internet Posts on Google with Search Engine Suppression

Search engine suppression refers to the process of burying, or pushing back, unwanted (defamatory) content on search engine results pages (SERPs). Suppressing defamation on search engine results is accomplished with Reverse Search Engine Optimization, or Reverse SEO, an advanced internet marketing tactic used in online reputation management campaigns.

 

Slander lawsuits are expensive and time consuming, but they can also be damaging. This is especially true if you’re suing a customer. So if you’re going to sue for online defamation, consider whether you can win and make sure it will be worth it.

You should also consider anti-SLAPP laws. Strategic lawsuits against public participation (SLAPPs) seek to silence free speech. Consequently, the burden of proof lies with the plaintiff, so it difficult to win even if you’re in the right.

 

If you do sue and win, damages for defamatory statements can range from millions of dollars to nothing at all. Typically, damages are calculated based on actual injuries, such as lost income, lost earning capacity, personal humiliation, and of course, pain and suffering.

 

 

While it is possible to sue for online defamation, it’s usually not a good idea except in extreme cases. For example, a single false review about a moldy muffin probably won’t cost you thousands in lost revenue. However, a calculated effort to spread false information about your business could create reputational risk. If a competitor publishes numerous fake reviews about you under different names, you should may need to take action.

 

Consequences of filing a defamation lawsuit

Whether you have a case or not, it’s important to understand that things might get worse before they get better. In the best-case scenario, you’ll quietly file and win your lawsuit, receive damages, and clear your name. But the reality may be much different.

 

When you start a defamation lawsuit, you may trigger “The Streisand Effect.” This is when an attempt to censor information actually amplifies it, and defamation suits are perfect examples of the phenomenon.

If you start such a lawsuit, the press will probably report on it. Unfortunately, that means you’ll have to remove more negative search results. If you win, you’ll be vindicated, and you can hope that the press clears your name. But in the meantime, if you take legal action, you could make matters worse.

 

If you’ve got a real case, you may be willing to take the risk, however. But if you lose, it could be even more difficult to repair your reputation.

 

Defamation has turned into somewhat of an epidemic online. This is largely due to the anonymous nature of the internet. Usually internet slander or libel occurs in comment sections, blog posts, review sites and social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter. The person who is guilty of the act can get away with it anonymously, facing little to no repercussions. It’s easy to do it, all that is needed is an internet connection, the right platform, and an audience of people who are willing to listen. However, it may not be as easy to remove defamation from the internet.

CONTACT US AT INFO@WEBCIDE.COM

Slander vs Defamation


So what is defamation? It is a damaged reputation caused by false statements. Libel is written defamation while slander is expressed orally. An example of a libel case would be to remove defamatory posts online. Slander can come in an audio or visual format. An example of slander would be statements made through a video sharing website like Youtube.

How Google Handles Defamation on Search Engine Results


Defamation has turned into somewhat of an epidemic online. This is largely due to the anonymous nature of the internet. Usually internet slander or libel occurs in comment sections, blog posts, review sites and social media accounts like Facebook and Twitter. The person who is guilty of the act can get away with it anonymously, facing little to no repercussions. It’s easy to do it, all that is needed is an internet connection, the right platform, and an audience of people who are willing to listen.

 

However, it may not be as easy to remove defamation from the internet.

So what is defamation? It is a damaged reputation caused by false statements. Libel is written defamation while slander is expressed orally. An example of a libel case would be to remove defamatory posts online. Slander can come in an audio or visual format. An example of slander would be statements made through a video sharing website like Youtube.

Alternative Ways to Handle Online Defamation


Contact the Website Administrator and Hosting Company
While the search engine giant isn’t making it any easier to taken down libel or slander, people can still take action to defend themselves against online reputation attacks. There is the option of reporting the defamation directly to the website host that is holding the defamatory remarks. This can be done by finding the company that hosts the website and then contacting the webmaster through an admin email. It is also a good idea to look up the site’s terms and conditions to see if the guilty party is in violation of their rules.

Contact the Person Who Posted the Defamatory Content Online
There is also the option of contacting the person who made the defamatory remarks. A polite plea may be what it takes to remove the content offline. While this may be a long shot, since you are dealing with someone who may enjoy publishing harmful material, it is still worth a try.

Get a Court Order to Have the Defamation Removed
When all else fails, there is always the option of obtaining a court order to take down the defamation. To obtain a court order, the attorney must provide legitimate claims for the lawsuit and then pursue the party who published the material. When faced with a court order, the vast majority of websites will comply and remove online defamation.

Hide or Bury Defamatory Internet Posts on Google with Search Engine Suppression
Search engine suppression refers to the process of burying, or pushing back, unwanted (defamatory) content on search engine results pages (SERPs). Suppressing defamation on search engine results is accomplished with Reverse Search Engine Optimization, or Reverse SEO, an advanced internet marketing tactic used in online reputation management campaigns.