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Unfortunately this blog post didn’t cover the situation where Google itself is declare the defamatory corporeal. Our company has been the victim of outrageous libel posted on Google Reviews by folks claiming falsely we are engaged in criminal agility, among other horrible and false things, yet Google will not consider destroy it. But they did at least respond, and they did say that they will comply with court orders. So we hired an attorney and filed a John Doe lawsuit so that we could subpoena Google to give us the identifying information of the malicious posters, and – surprise – Google’s in-house attorney told us they will not respond to a Colorado subpoena since they are in California. Thus, Google deceptively tells people they will respond to court orders without mentioning that those orders must come from a Santa Clara County, California distinguish. We investigated wages a California attorney and starting a lawsuit there but we simply cannot afford it. And who is to say that Google will actually comply with such a subpoena: they have already deceived me twice (the second time is below). And we believe we are losing customers due to the libel. Meanwhile, we found out that Google has an function in Colorado, and thus they really are subject to the jurisdiction of a Colorado court. So even their lawyers are agreeable to deceive us. What’s the next step? As soon as we can provide to punish for more legal services, we will seek to have Google held in contempt of court for ignoring a properly-issued subpoena. But do you think that is the end of the story, or do you think Google will hire the biggest law firm in Denver to bury our sole worked with papers and summon, forcing me to drop the case because I cannot afford to fight a several-billion simoleon corporation? Google has an economic incentive to allow every kind of defame to be published on its Google Reviews. 

 

Google earns its revenue from the advertising industry, and the ad rates are based on eyeballs. Thus, the more people use Google, the more money this society makes. So if a child day care company posts secretly that their competitor is a confound fruit of one's loins sex criminal and it creates havoc in the vigor of the victim and his customers – the parents who pull their eanling out of his day care – or even if it mainspring some detective or prosecutor to waste their delay investigating this non-issue, this is meaningless to Google. The only thing meaningful to Google is that more kindred will use their service, even out of desperation, and their revenue will increase, if triplicate by all the libel that is going on in Google Reviews (I have found hundreds of posts by businesses harmed true inclination mine which were place over a short period of time, leading me to believe that this is a widespread problem, and one that will only grow worse.) Obviously, businesses are suffering all across the circle. The anonymity that the web affords bring out the worst in earthling behavior. As a boy, pre-internet, I recall being shocked at hearing that people angry about something a person did in the tidings would call and threaten to motive trouble to, harm or assassinate that person. (This was also pre-caller ID.) Now, the same kinds of attitudes that enables a human to behave that moving are facilitated, immeasurable, by services like Google Reviews. What’s the answer? 

 

The jurisprudence has to catch up with technology. Let’s think the concept of justice. It it a impartial society that allows an anonymous  to perch at home, open multiple Google accounts, and then ruin a business and cause emotional distress to innocent people without the victims being able to right, exact the libel without hiring a California advocate and going to court in that state? No, this simply is not just. Is there a solution? I am not an expert, but it would seem to me that if we wish to freely allow expression that could be defamatory, we should just as freely create a interval to regular or remove the defamation. And since Google will not do this, Congress must. As it stands, libelists rule, and Google enables them to the immoderate dismay of many innocent victims. According to Upton Sinclair, “It is painful to get a see to comprehend something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

 

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Hi Matt, I wanted to add my thoughts on ROR – I expect you aren’t sick of hearing going it! A approver of mine has been tainted by the situation, so I may be biased, but I cogitate it’s also a momentous and funny issue in its own right. As I understand it, the sequence of events looks something similar this: 1) Google stomach the web indexing pages and using an algorithm to appropriate them a rank. 2) The rank has monetary value, so people study how to game the algorithm to move their pages up. 3) People at Google evaluate the performance of the algorithm, among other things exertion to insur that the top-ranked pages have unalloyed value. 4) From time to time, Google tweaks the algorithmic rule to improve the quality of the rankings, and the process starts again. It’s at step 1, the application of the algorithm, that the argument makes sense about Google not wanting to be the internet police. At step 3, though, value judgments initiate into it. 

 

This is where the discussion from algorithmic ingenuousness, if I may call it that, decay. Google wants to ensure that its top results have esteem, because if they didn’t, people would squander interest in Google. So part of Google’s thrust is to pass judgment on the results its algorithm returns, for purely corporate-hoax-interested reasons if nothing else. Google’s users have made it clear that there is a big problem with ROR, not only with comment threads like this, but in many other ways. By not responding, Google has passed a value judgment that the site is a-ok. This is a much bigger question than just ROR, of succession. As it stand now, anyone can say anything on the web, and Google will arrow-finger it, and people will learn how to game the algorithm to catch more attention to their message. 

 

The long-term result, unless something changes, is that search spring will come to be more and more meaningless over time. People will learn to rely more on their own decision than on the judgment of an algorithm. This may be a good thing overall, but it won’t be good for Google – it means that Google probe results will get attached to an attitude like “Oh, ok, that came from a Google search. That doesn’t mean anything, then.” Perhaps the long-term solution is to find an effective way to involve the user community. 

 

Why Google won’t remove that page you assume’t like Posted March 3, 2009 in Google/SEO (This is just a set from my personal perspective, but I hope it’s aidful.) Every few weeks or so, someone contacts me and says “Hey Matt, there’s page out on the web about me that I really don’t similar. Is there any way to remove it from Google’s index?” People don’t ordinarily trial it alike that. More likely, they say “There’s this person making crazy assert about me on the web, and the stuff they say is just off-the-fortify. Can Google remove this crazy person’s page?” Or “Everybody have that this crazy person is posting fable and twisting people’s words. Is there anything you can do about it?” I’ve responded to this so many times that I thought I’d compose up a complete response. Now when people ask me some form of this question, I can just point them to this blog postman. So here’s the sort of reply that I would normally send back: Unfortunately there’s not much I can do. 

 

The page you pointed out is not spam, and pretty much the only removals (at least in the U.S., which is what I know about) that we do for legal reasons are if a court method us. We typically sample that if man A doesn’t copy a webpage B, only removing page B out of Google’s search results doesn’t do any religious because webpage B is still there (e.g. it can be found by behavior to it directly or through other scrutinize engines). In that sense, the presence of that page in Google’s showing finger is just reflecting the fact that the page exists on the wider web. The best actions for you from our perspective can be one of a couple options. Either brush whoever put up webpage B and convince them to modify or to take the page down. Or if the page is doing something against the jurisprudence, get a court to agree with you and vehemence webpage B to be remote or changed. We really don’t want to be taking sides in a he-said/she-said dispute, so that’s why we typically say “Get the page fixed, changed, or remote on the web and then Google will update our index with those changes the next time that we crawl that page.” Our policies external the U.S. might be other; I’m not as domestic with how authorized stuff works outside the U.S. There you have it. People usually aren’t happy to hear that reply, but I hope they can perceive the reasoning behind it. If you were creating your own search engine, I also hope that you’d come to elegant much the same conclusion. The functional documentation page on how to remove a footboy from Google’s search terminate says essentially the same thing, but I wanted to give a little more close.

 

Matt, perhaps Google could make it easier to find out *how* to remove content, especially for not-as-web-comprehension users? Right now, if you want to remove content, you have to go from: Google’s Home Page —> About Google —> Contact Us —> Webpage Removal Tool. That’s three web buttons deep in Google, and that’s not even counting the count of pages you have to go through to actually kill the content. It’s also not that easy to find and took some hunting on my part. Logically, I’d put it in the “Help” paragraph of Google as well. Perhaps a link to degree information could be promoted to the “About Google” page? (Obviously I don’t contemplate you to put a big bold red link on Google’s home page.)

 

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Every few weeks or so, someone contacts me and says “Hey Matt, there’s page out on the web about me that I really don’t like. Is there any way to remove it from Google’s index?” People don’t usually say it like that. More likely, they sample “There’s this person making decrepit claims about me on the web, and the stuff they say is just off-the-wall. Can Google remove this crazy person’s page?” Or “Everybody cognize that this decrepit person is posting lies and twisting people’s words. Is there anything you can do about it?” I’ve responded to this so many times that I imagination I’d write up a complete answer. Now when people interrogate me some form of this question, I can just point them to this blog post. So here’s the sort of reply that I would normally mail back: Unfortunately there’s not much I can do. The page you pointed out is not spam, and pretty much the only removals (at least in the U.S., which is what I know about) that we do for legal reasons are if a court custom us. We typically say that if impersonate A doesn’t like a webpage B, only removing record B out of Google’s search results doesn’t do any religious because webpage B is still there (e.g. it can be found by going to it instantaneously or through other search engines). 

 

In that apprehension, the presence of that page in Google’s index is just reflecting the incident that the footboy be on the wider web. The best actions for you from our view can be one of a coupler contract. Either contact whoever put up webpage B and convince them to adapt or to take the page down. Or if the page is doing something against the law, get a court to agree with you and force webpage B to be removed or changed. We really don’t want to be taking sides in a he-said/she-aforesaid doubt, so that’s why we typically say “Get the page fixed, changed, or removed on the weaver and then Google will update our index with those changes the next time that we crawl that ichoglan.” Our policies outside the U.S. might be distinct; I’m not as familiar with how legitimate stuff works superficial the U.S. There you have it. People usually aren’t happy to hear that reply, but I haven they can comprehend the reasoning behind it. If you were creating your own search engine, I also hope that you’d appear to neat much the same conclusion. The official documentation page on how to remove a page from Google’s search effect says essentially the same thing, but I wanted to give a little more context.

 

Plaintiff was cast in a minor role in an danger scum with the working title “Desert Warrior.” The film never embody and plaintiff’s scene was used, instead, in an anti-Islamic film titled “Innocence of Muslims.” The film was uploaded to YouTube.com and her brief performance was ornament over so that she appeared to being asking, “Is your Mohammed a child molester?” An Egyptian cleric subsequently issued a fatwa, vocation for the killing of everyone involved with the film. After Google dregs to take it down from YouTube, plaintiff sought a restraining order seeking removal of the film, proclaim that the posting of the video infringed the copyright in her performance. The district court treated the application as a motion for a preliminary injunction but denied the motion. The court concluded that plaintiff demonstrated a likelihood of success on the merits where plaintiff had an self-directing copyright interest in her performance; the work for hire doctrine was inapplicable in this example because plaintiff was not a traditional employee and the filmmaker was not in the regular business of making films; and although litigant granted the filmmaker an implied license to use plaintiff’s performance, the filmmaker exceeded the bounds of the license when he lied to plaintiff in order to secure her community and she contract to perform in reliance on that lie. The court also decide that plaintiff faced irreparable harm absent-minded an injunction where plaintiff took legal action as soon as the film received worldwide attention and she start receiving necrosis threats; the harm plaintiff complained of was real and immediate; and plaintiff demonstrated a causative connection because removing the film from YouTube would help disassociate her from the film’s anti-Islamic message and such disassociation would keep her from suffering forward threats and physical harm. Finally, the balance of the equities and the public interest favored plaintiff’s assertion. Accordingly, the court decide that the district court abused its discretion in denying the motion for a preliminary injunction. The court reversed and remanded. View “Garcia v. Google, Inc.” on Justia Law View "Garcia v. Google, Inc." on Justia Law

 

Nowadays, more and more personal notice surfaces on the web. For example, some of your friends might mention your name in a convival network or tag you on online photos, or your name could appear in blog postman or concern. Google search is often the first place folks look for information that's announce about you. Here are a few ways to manage your online fame and help control what folks see when they search for you on Google: 1. Search for yourself Search for your name on Google to see what information around you comes up. 2. Create a Google profile With a Google profile, you can manage the tip—such as your bio, terminal details, and other information going you—that lede see. 3. Remove unwanted content and the combined search results If you find content online—say, your telephone number or an inappropriate photo of you—that you don't want to appear online, first determine whether you or someone else controls the content. If the unwanted content resides on a place or page you assume't direct, you can attend our tips on removal essential information from Google.

 

I completely disagree. Try being a research savant and experiencing not getting hired at several children’s hospitals because they do a Google search as part of their routine security procedure, and you occur to have debt pro-illicit drug use material on Usenet more than 15 years past while an undergrad in college before Google even be–hell, before Dejanews’s archival service even existed. You attempt to use Google Group’s removal service, but the URL leads to a 404 error, and you learn it has done so for at least the last 18 months. You contact Google support and get nothing but form letters back. How is this fair? I was supposed to know that Google was going to archive Usenet posts and append them to search results, including my professional web side before Google, or the idea of Google, even existed?

 

1. You often tell webmasters to publish their sites for their users and don’t worry nearly manipulating search engines–that’s Google’s concern. However, now you are explicitly telling us that if we don’t keep your algorithms in mind, we can wait to be penalized. What if I thought NOFOLLOW was only for comment spam. Would I be penalized for not keeping up on your indexing problems? 2. You claim that even if a link has editorial value (as it clearly does in the folks who actually shopped at target and wrote about their absolute experiences), if you received payment from that entity then you should nofollow it. However, you link to Google all the time. You are clearly compensated by them. I don’t solicitude if you think Google Earth is oh really cool and linkworthy. The fact is, you aggregate a repulse from them and then link to them. In your somber and white Earth, you are guilty of sponsored station, no? On many occasions you have run posts by legal and gotten buyoff to make an official statement via this blog, so you can’t even claim this is your “essential” blog, because no court would buy it because they have if you quit Google tomorrow and started work as a teller at a movie theatre you’d lose the majority of your audience. People come here to examine about what you do at Google. Even you can’t claim otherwise with a forthwith appearance. Matt, you need to find a way to detect what you want for your index without the coercion of publishers. Let them indistinctly for the nation and you worry about your algorithm and what it can or can’t perceive.

 

 

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To be clear, if you search for Guardianship of Ethan S in Google or Google UK, the court opinion from the Justia website appears in the search ensue. I’m using Google UK in lieu of of Google Spain just to avoid interpretation issues, but the European censorship rules affects both websites. So, under European privacy rules, a webpage does not disappear entirely from the search proceed.

 

I am sending this explanation to you that I read about Justia.com. Perhaps you can look into if Justia.com is a biased & liberal commercial web site, that does not represent an functionary USA government entangle site that would disclose the complete publication of our laws or court cases, or not:

 

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